Planning a Community Science (AKA Citizen Science) Research Project

Image: Projects profiled in the dossier – DECODE, Flora Incognita, Open Humans, Ring-a-Scientist, Safecast, and Curieuze Neuzen

Cite as:

DOI

10.25815/ktnw-y834

Citation format: The Chicago Manual of Style, 17th Edition

Generation Research. ‘Planning a Community Science (AKA Citizen Science) Research Project’, 2019. https://doi.org/10.25815/ktnw-y834.

Generation Research Dossier #1

The dossier is designed as a conclusion of the initial cluster of articles for the Generation Research theme ‘Post-Digital Community Science‘ which ran over May/June 2019 and is accompanied by a collaboratively built ‘Community Science Index’.

Intro

The conventional role and partner in a research project would be — a PI, a Co-Investigator, co-authors, a community, partner institution, an SME, or data provider — and their roles are not always fixed and quite often can overlap. Similarly this is the case with how a Community Science project design can shape the roles and types of participation by the public. And as with any module or work package you design for a research programme the goals and activities need to be carefully planned. For this dossier we have commented on six projects using Community Science that have lessons that can be widely applied. Additionally there is a collaboratively built ‘Community Science Index’ with further projects, collaborative tools, and spaces and event formats, etc.

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Illuminating Dark Knowledge



How innovation in search engines needs renewing with
open working and open indexes

Image: LA at Night, Wikimedia, https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/7/75/LA_at_night.jpg 

Without being able to build on top of existing — search tools and indexes — innovation in search engines is being held back and letting down researchers and the public. The Open Access and Open Science movement that have worked hard to make free hundreds of thousands of publications, but at the last mile search engines are failing to effectively deliver on discovery. Public knowledge is hidden in plain sight — a phenomenon called “Dark Knowledge”. This article is a call for open infrastructural ‘ways of working’ to be adopted as ‘the new normal’ to turn this situation around in software and interface development for scholarly search.

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