Open Science Top Ten Tools – All Open Source!

DOI:

10.25815/7hta-ve88

Citation format: The Chicago Manual of Style, 17th Edition

Generation R. ‘Open Science Top Ten Tools – All Open Source!’, 2019. https://doi.org/10.25815/7hta-ve88.

A list of general purpose tools for researchers compiled by Generation R which can be used with no additional learning other than standard user interface familiarity.

There will be an advanced ‘Data Scientists 4 All’ Top Ten coming soon 🙂

This top ten index is part of GenRs theme Integrating Open Science Learning into Higher Education (Jan/Mar 2019).

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Will Education Become More Open?

Fig 1. The interplay of open science and open education

D

OI:

10.25815/hh4f-zn73

Citation format: The Chicago Manual of Style, 17th Edition

Heck, Tamara. ‘Will Education Become More Open?’, 2019. https://doi.org/10.25815/hh4f-zn73.

Open science practitioners embrace the ideas of sharing and communicating their research and interests as well as collaborating with like-minded peers, i.e., practicing co-science (McKiernan et al. 2016) such as on the Open Science MOOC1 platform. If they admit to those goals regarding their research, it can be assumed that those researchers adapt their attitudes and practices towards learning and teaching, respectively. So, if researchers move towards open science practices, will they do so in their higher education teaching? Will education become more open? More generally, what would open science principles (Bezjak et al. 2018) in education look like, for educators and learners, respectively?

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Collaborative Text Invitation! Top 10 FOSS Open Science Tools & Services for Researchers

List of tools on the pad

The motivation behind the work is to help students and researchers in higher education with their study practice by providing them with the best free and open source — tools and services — from the Open Science community.


This is a collaborative work, please contribute!

All contributors will be listed in the blogpost and journal article.

This document is live and on the web. A ‘finished’ blogpost will be published on GenR on February 18th and following that date a further ‘academic article’ will be made and submitted to an appropriate journal.

What to contribute?

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Making a ‘Pre-Publishing’ Research Workflow Open Source

Being open & transparent saves time & improves research

Image: Before – After. ‘Being open & transparent saves time & improves research: The Grackle Project’ and ‘Making a ‘Pre-Publishing’ Research Workflow Open Source’ modification of slide 25 from keynote presentation from the 13th Munin Conference (Tromsø, Norway) by Dr. Corina Logan, “We won’t be… ‘Bullied into Bad Science'”, 28.11.2018, https://osf.io/sy9f7/ | See section ‘Failing to make the complete workflow Open Source’ for annotations

At the Munin conference on scholarly publishing in Norway at the end of November (2018) Dr. Corina Logan presented a keynote “We won’t be… ‘Bullied into Bad Science'”. While following on the livestream GenR offered, as an experiment, to convert Dr. Logan’s ‘pre-publishing’ workflow to use only Open Source tools. As a collaborative open-work using Cryptpad we have been able to replace ‘most’ tools and for the exceptions chart a way to make a totally Free and Open Source Software workflow. In this short experiment, once again a
recurring issue has been encountered, that the basic provision of an infrastructural pillar of ‘modern research literacy’ has been overlooked—namely Open Source software—in this case the provision of ‘simple tools for authoring’. This is only the start of the work and your invited to chip in on the pad — EDITME!.

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Research or Perish! The Decentralized Web and Open Research. A Report from the FORCE11 2018 Montreal Conference

Image: FORCE11 2018 Montreal Conference, group photo

I attended the FORCE11 annual conference—an event with a very broad coverage of scholarly communications—with a mission in mind. This mission was to see what decentralized web (DWeb) research projects had matured to a level to be reusable in the working context of a scholars. Most DWeb systems and services are in an alpha phase, so in early R&D state where things are still experimental and not meant for large scale professional use. When a systems is in an alpha phase the objective is to carry out R&D to be able to test a set of assumptions and so improve a system to be able for it to move onto become a beta system, and then a full release. My very real concern is that almost all DWeb systems being proposed don’t know enough about how scholars and academia works, and instead use very thin models of scholarly workflows, that in turn means the chances of adoption, moving through the development phases, or solving the big problems in science communications are greatly reduced.

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