Next Generation Researchers and Open Science in the University

Image: Riesenspatz Infoillustration (http://riesenspatz.de) für Wikimedia Deutschland – Riesenspatz Infoillustration (http://riesenspatz.de) CC BY-SA 4.0

DOI:

10.25815/665f-4f56

Citation format: The Chicago Manual of Style, 17th Edition

Open Science Fellows Program . ‘Next Generation Researchers and Open Science in the University’, 2019. https://doi.org/10.25815/665f-4f56.

@OpenSciFellows | Thanks to Sarah Behrens, Wikimedia DE, Alumna Caroline Fischer (University of Potsdam) and Fellow Rima-Maria Rahal (Tilburg University).

How can we spread Open Science principles to the next generation of researchers? One way is to practice Open Scholarship already at the university. Another way is to encourage people teaching in higher education to spread the word for Open Science, such as the Open Science Fellows Program (‘Wikimedia Deutschland/Open Science Fellows Program – Wikiversity’ n.d.) in Germany. This program offers the environment and network within open communities to support and promote the idea of Open Science/Open Scholarship.The program is a joint initiative of Wikimedia Deutschland, the Stifterverband, and the Volkswagen Foundation and aims at promoting the idea of free knowledge in academic research and making scientific knowledge more accessible and reusable. Therefore, twenty fellows were selected from diverse disciplines to develop practices of Open Science in their projects and to pass on their knowledge as multipliers within their academic institutions. Above all, the program facilitates the exchange and networking of active participants in the area of Open Science to advance the gradual dissemination of science and research. Further, mentors from different disciplines offer insights into their open research practice. This program is just one possible way to address academic institutions (e.g. Berlin-Call-to-action-for-Open-Science) (‘Berlin Call to Action’ 2016) and to establish ambassadors for openness within the scientific world in order to sustainably strengthen the free knowledge movement.

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