Will Education Become More Open?

Fig 1. The interplay of open science and open education

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OI:

10.25815/hh4f-zn73

Citation format: The Chicago Manual of Style, 17th Edition

Heck, Tamara. ‘Will Education Become More Open?’, 2019. https://doi.org/10.25815/hh4f-zn73.

Open science practitioners embrace the ideas of sharing and communicating their research and interests as well as collaborating with like-minded peers, i.e., practicing co-science (McKiernan et al. 2016) such as on the Open Science MOOC1 platform. If they admit to those goals regarding their research, it can be assumed that those researchers adapt their attitudes and practices towards learning and teaching, respectively. So, if researchers move towards open science practices, will they do so in their higher education teaching? Will education become more open? More generally, what would open science principles (Bezjak et al. 2018) in education look like, for educators and learners, respectively?

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Redistributing the Future: An Interview with MOVING MOOC Makers Sabine Barthold and Franziska Günther

Cite as: DOI:10.25815/J661-FK24

Citation format: The Chicago Manual of Style, 17th Edition

Barthold, S., & Günther, F. Redistributing the Future: An Interview with MOVING MOOC Makers Sabine Barthold and Franziska Günther. Generation R. https://doi.org/10.25815/J661-FK24.

Sabine and Franziska explore how they see MOVING MOOC, alongside other open science initiatives, as contributing to closing the research skills gap between what open science has on offer for the future of research and what is being delivered for students and young researchers in universities now — with the aim to providing a ‘safe space’ to up their open collaborative science skills. To use William Gibson’s much used adage “The future is already here — it’s just not evenly distributed”.

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Integrating Open Science Learning into Higher Education: A GenR Theme – Jan/Feb ’19

The Open Science learning theme will take two approaches to the question of how to integrate Open Science practices into higher education. The first, will be to examine ways for students to get on board — using Open Science methods, using open source tools, or being made aware of how to get ‘more’ credit and attribution. The second approach, being about trends and innovations in ways of teaching, for example ‘The Carpentries’ an open peer-learning network for data, software, and library skills with the formula of being ‘welcoming’ and making good use of the wealth of teaching methods available.

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Decentralizing Education via the Blockchain

Figure: The process of generating Smart Blockchain Badges by matching the learner’s skills with job offerings.

Today’s centralized education model is no longer sustainable, as learning happens increasingly outside the brick-and-mortar lecture halls of schools, colleges, and universities, in online platforms within communities of like-minded individuals. In the networked, digitally empowered world of the 21st century, education providers often do not have remit or the means and capacity to cover the range of activities learners engage with, which attest their achievements, knowledge, and skills.

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Software Citation and a Collaboration with Open Science MOOC

For the theme Software Citation running from June to the end of the summer we will be looking at how to move over our research and findings over to community learning resources like Open Science MOOC (OS MOOC).

If you would like to get involved you chat on Gitter or check out plans on GitHub.

What we will be doing with Open Science MOOC

OS MOOC are looking to release their first module ‘Open Research Software and Open Source’ over the start of Summer ’18 and Generation R will look to help create a portion of the syllabus on the Software Citation theme.

Material is developed on GitHub and then move it over to OS MOOC’s GitHub instance.

Other learning resources possibilities

Options for other contributions we can make to learning resources are:

  • with literature list collected in Zotero as a ‘collaborative library’ under the tag software-cite,
  • helping review how-to guides in the Software / Data / Library Carpentry field, or
  • in excellent resources such as cite.research-software.org.