Loners, Pathfinders, or Explorers? How are the Humanities Progressing in Open Science?

Image: Barcamp Open Science, organized by the Leibniz Research Alliance Open Science and hosted by Wikimedia Deutschland, 18 March, 2019, Berlin. Ralf Rebmann, CC BY 4.0 license.

Cite as:

DOI

10.25815/x516-wf23

Citation format: The Chicago Manual of Style, 17th Edition

Tóth-Czifra, Erzsébet & Wuttke, Ulrike. ‘Loners, Pathfinders, or Explorers? How are the Humanities Progressing in Open Science?’, 2019. https://doi.org/10.25815/x516-wf23.

There is an ever-increasing number of people who are interested in — or practice — Open Science or Open Scholarship. Whatever it means to us individually, we all have a need from time to time to see the bigger picture and reflect on where are we in this space: what we hope to achieve through it, how others can help us, and reflect on what are the shared values in the open research culture for us and for the society at large.

The Open Science Barcamp, which was for the fifth year already a recurring pre-event for the more formal International Open Science Conference in Berlin, is all about this reflection. It brings together open-minded curious people from different countries, (disciplinary) background and level of involvement in Open Science for a full day of informal, but intensive and action-oriented exchange about how to take collaboration, transparency, reproducibility, and in general the development of an open culture to the next level.

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Jupyter Notebooks in Higher Education

Image: Illustration from A Personal Computer for Children of All Ages. ACM, Boston, Alan Kay, 1972. http://www.vpri.org/pdf/hc_pers_comp_for_children.pdf.

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DOI

10.25815/kwp5-xg67

Citation format: The Chicago Manual of Style, 17th Edition

Generation Research & Wagner, Andreas. ‘Jupyter Notebooks in Higher Education’, 2019. https://doi.org/10.25815/kwp5-xg67.

Thanks to Dr. Andreas Wagner for his contribution and all the pointer from de-RSE email list members.

Jupyter Notebooks are a way in which you can write and execute code in the browser. This is a small and simple step but most definitely not the end of the story. It is worth reflecting that another small step of the editable web ‘a wiki’ from Ward Cunningham in 1994 (Cunningham and Leuf 2001) wasn’t always around and the changes this brought about are plain to see.

First and foremost Jupyter Notebooks (Rule, Tabard, and Hollan 2018) has gained attention in research fields because it offers a route for reproducibility of research results. A Jupyter Notebook file can be downloaded and instantly the package can be run in the browser to generate results, say a chart, while simultaneously the data and code for generating results, such as a chart, can be examined.

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