Open Science, Collaboration and Participation in Energy System Research

Image: “StEmp-Tool Anhalt-Bitterfeld-Wittenberg“ © Reiner Lemoine Institut | CC BY 4.0

Cite as:

DOI

10.25815/63vz-v811

Citation format: The Chicago Manual of Style, 17th Edition

Hülk, Ludwig. ‘Open Science, Collaboration and Participation in Energy System Research’, 2019. https://doi.org/10.25815/63vz-v811.

Open Energy Modelling has been built up as a research community over the last ten years aiming to bring transparency to the field using an array of Open Science methods for the planning of energy systems. The role of collaboration in the research cycle used by scientists in this engineering community is now an established Open Science practice. Similar practices of collaboration and participation outside of academia involving the public are still in their infancy. Harnessing public participation in energy planning and policy development is likely change as the energy sector is undergoing rapid changes due to its large contribution to greenhouse gases and the consequent demands for transparency and innovation to tackle climate change.

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An Open Energy System Modeling Community

Image: GPLv2+ license notice for the now‑defunct deeco energy system model added on 24 February 2003. Courtesy Robbie Morrison

Cite as:

DOI

10.25815/ff3b-d154

Citation format: The Chicago Manual of Style, 17th Edition

Morrison, Robbie . ‘An Open Energy System Modeling Community’, 2019. https://doi.org/10.25815/ff3b-d154.

The Open Energy Modelling Initiative (shortened to openmod) is an online and offline umbrella community devoted to promoting open energy system modeling and analysis. While there are no restrictions on application area, the bulk of funded research is directed toward questions involving public policy. As of late‑2019, the openmod has about 600 participants on its mailing list, with most of them being full‑time researchers or analysts. More information on Wikipedia. Key URLs are listed in the infobox below.

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Open Climate Knowledge: 100% OA for Climate Change 📖 / 🌍

Peter Murray-Rust launched the openNotebook resource at last week’s #eLifeSprint2019*. openNotebook is a framework for data mining, searching, and reusing research publications. Below he walks through the steps of how to use the framework in the context of climate change and opening up research to the public. Peter Murray-Rust, GenR and the Open Science Lab at TIB have initiated an open research collaboration Open Climate Knowledge to address the question of how to improve on the low rates of open access publishing related to climate change. Together we want to change this. Firstly by establishing better stats on OA rates and secondly, by coming up with a plan and recommendations for an accelerated transition to 100% OA for climate change.

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A Community Science Index

Image: categories and example from the index, including: DECODE, Jupyter Notebooks, Global Open Science Hardware Roadmap, and PreTalx

(AKA Citizen Science)

Cite as:

DOI

10.25815/6pbz-ns09

Citation format: The Chicago Manual of Style, 17th Edition

Generation Research. ‘A Community Science Index, 2019. https://doi.org/10.25815/6pbz-ns09.

This is a collaboratively made index of resources to accompany the GenR theme ‘Post-Digital Community Science‘ which ran over May/June 2019. The theme blogposts can all be seen here online.

The index has been organised to represent a number of areas and questions that were felt to be important for researchers looking to organise and plan research projects making use of Community Science. The categories in the index are:

  • projects,
  • collaborative tools and open access,
  • FOSS for open hardware, and
  • spaces.
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Planning a Community Science (AKA Citizen Science) Research Project

Cite as:

DOI

10.25815/ktnw-y834

Citation format: The Chicago Manual of Style, 17th Edition

Generation Research. ‘Planning a Community Science (AKA Citizen Science) Research Project’, 2019. https://doi.org/10.25815/ktnw-y834.

Generation Research Dossier #1

The GenR dossier is designed as a conclusion of the initial cluster of articles for the Generation Research theme ‘Post-Digital Community Science‘ which ran over May/June 2019 and is accompanied by a collaboratively built ‘Community Science Index’ of projects and tools.

Intro

The conventional role and partner in a research project would be — a PI, a Co-Investigator, co-authors, a community, partner institution, an SME, or data provider — and their roles are not always fixed and quite often can overlap. Similarly this is the case with how a Community Science project design can shape the roles and types of participation by the public. And as with any module or work package you design for a research programme the goals and activities need to be carefully planned. For this dossier we have commented on six projects using Community Science that have lessons that can be widely applied. Additionally there is a collaboratively built ‘Community Science Index’ with further projects, collaborative tools, and spaces and event formats, etc.

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