The Busiest Researchers Ever! The Decentralized Web & Ending the Culture of Misguided Metrics in Science

Caption: ‘International System of Units’. The SI base units: Symbol, Name, Quantity. A ampere electric current. k kelvin temperature. s second time. m metre length. kg kilogram mass. cd candela luminous intensity. mol mole amount of substance. Wikipedia.

Karmen Condic-Jurkic looks at a reboot for academic knowledge infrastructures with the decentralized web as a thought catalyst for making science in new ways: to disseminate knowledge faster and more easily; and to call for a clean start on metrics for making better research by rewarding—best practice, scientific integrity, or to steer research to be socially relevant for example with experiments in tokenomics.

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Decentralizing Education via the Blockchain

Figure: The process of generating Smart Blockchain Badges by matching the learner’s skills with job offerings.

Today’s centralized education model is no longer sustainable, as learning happens increasingly outside the brick-and-mortar lecture halls of schools, colleges, and universities, in online platforms within communities of like-minded individuals. In the networked, digitally empowered world of the 21st century, education providers often do not have remit or the means and capacity to cover the range of activities learners engage with, which attest their achievements, knowledge, and skills.

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#GenR Software Citation Round-up

A concluding summary of headline issues from the Open Science theme of ‘software citation’. Software citation is an important building block in the future of Open Science and has run as Generation R’s launch editorial theme. As with all of the topics of focus on Gen R editorially the issue will be revisited on regular occasions as major developments occur.

What is intrinsically important about software citation?

For the main part it would appear to be the case that until recently no one had indexed, or cataloged, research software. If we compared this situation to the cataloging of literature, and somehow nobody had cataloged publications for the last fifty years, then this would just be unimaginable. But for software this has been the case — for the last half-century there has been virtually no widespread and systematic indexing of software, or its citation in literature. There are exceptions, and the Astrophysics Source Code Library is such an exception and worthy of mention, started in 1999. (ASCL >1999)

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Beyond #FakeScience: How to Overcome Shallow Certainty in Scholarly Communication

Bad science journals – nothing new here

Science journalism in Germany in the last days was awash with a report on “predatory publishers” and an integrity ‘crisis’ for German science. Journalists from regional media outlets, WDR, NDR, and Süddeutsche Zeitung, in collaboration with some international partners (e.g., Le Monde) released new information (overview and links by ARD Tagesschau, in German) showing that some authors from esteemed research institutes in Germany previously had articles published by journals who apply next to no peer review on article submissions.

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Make Your Code Citable Using GitHub and Zenodo: A How-to Guide

This how-to guide is designed for researchers who want to create and re-use GitHub-based repositories in academic literature.

Open Science MOOC

The following guide has been made by the Open Science MOOC as part of preparation work on its first module release ‘Open Research Software and Open Source‘. The Open Science MOOC is made by an international volunteer group of over a hundred contributors, which you are free to join.

Gen R is a partner contributor to Open Science MOOC and over time as our editorial paths cross we will look to make a variety of contributions to the MOOC as a free and open learning resource for all.

Software Citation

It’s hard to overstate how important it is to have a record of what software has been produced, and also how little has been done in the past to create such indexes and catalogs of software. It’s like no one cataloged books for the last half-century and only now retrospectively took up the task.

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