A Book Review — Citizen Science: Co-optation Instead of Cooperation?

Cite as:

DOI

10.20389/jsf3-m585

Citation format: The Chicago Manual of Style, 17th Edition

Greshake Tzovaras, Bastian. ‘A Book Review — Citizen Science: Co-optation Instead of Cooperation?’, 2019. https://doi.org/10.20389/jsf3-m585.

Bastian Greshake Tzovaras reviews the book Citizen Science Innovation in Open Science, Society and Policy from the university open access press, UCL Press. Greshake Tzovaras highlights the Ten Principles of Citizen Science and opens up questions about how to progress deeper participation and decision making by the public.

citizen science

Citizen Science Innovation in Open Science, Society and Policy

Open Access
ISBN: 9781787352339
DOI: 10.14324/111.9781787352339
Publication: October 15, 2018
Creative Commons 4.0 International license (CC BY 4.0)

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Community Science, Fueled by Your Personal Data

Image: Open Humans sketch. All images courtesy Open Humans

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10.25815/4gdw-cv05

Citation format: The Chicago Manual of Style, 17th Edition

Greshake Tzovaras, Bastian. ‘Community Science, Fueled by Your Personal Data’, 2019. https://doi.org/10.25815/4gdw-cv05.

Science, research, and society are missing out on the wealth of personal data being generated from the likes of fitness and health monitoring, and genetics because of poor regulatory framework to support user orientated and privacy driven data policies — AKA data sovereignty! Open Humans offers a working platform and data storage inside a standardized ecosystem that puts the users in control of their data and protects privacy.

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Open Participatory Research — Four Challenges for Opening Science Beyond Scientific Institutions

Image: Do-It-Together Science Bus, 2017, Waag (BY-NC-SA), https://waag.org/nl/project/do-it-together-science-bus

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DOI

10.25815/qykn-de07

Citation format: The Chicago Manual of Style, 17th Edition

Göbel, Claudia. ‘Open Participatory Research — Four Challenges for Opening Science Beyond Scientific Institutions’, 2019. https://doi.org/10.25815/qykn-de07.

Claudia Göbel proposes a framework of examination for how Citizen Science and other types of participatory research should form a more prominent part of the much needed cultural change in knowledge institutions. This is to complement the many reforms already underway in other areas of Open Science & Scholarship.

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Loners, Pathfinders, or Explorers? How are the Humanities Progressing in Open Science?

Image: Barcamp Open Science, organized by the Leibniz Research Alliance Open Science and hosted by Wikimedia Deutschland, 18 March, 2019, Berlin. Ralf Rebmann, CC BY 4.0 license.

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DOI

10.25815/x516-wf23

Citation format: The Chicago Manual of Style, 17th Edition

Tóth-Czifra, Erzsébet & Wuttke, Ulrike. ‘Loners, Pathfinders, or Explorers? How are the Humanities Progressing in Open Science?’, 2019. https://doi.org/10.25815/x516-wf23.

There is an ever-increasing number of people who are interested in — or practice — Open Science or Open Scholarship. Whatever it means to us individually, we all have a need from time to time to see the bigger picture and reflect on where are we in this space: what we hope to achieve through it, how others can help us, and reflect on what are the shared values in the open research culture for us and for the society at large.

The Open Science Barcamp, which was for the fifth year already a recurring pre-event for the more formal International Open Science Conference in Berlin, is all about this reflection. It brings together open-minded curious people from different countries, (disciplinary) background and level of involvement in Open Science for a full day of informal, but intensive and action-oriented exchange about how to take collaboration, transparency, reproducibility, and in general the development of an open culture to the next level.

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