Jupyter Notebooks in Higher Education

Image: Illustration from A Personal Computer for Children of All Ages. ACM, Boston, Alan Kay, 1972. http://www.vpri.org/pdf/hc_pers_comp_for_children.pdf.

Cite as:

DOI

10.25815/kwp5-xg67

Citation format: The Chicago Manual of Style, 17th Edition

Generation Research & Wagner, Andreas. ‘Jupyter Notebooks in Higher Education’, 2019. https://doi.org/10.25815/kwp5-xg67.

Thanks to Dr. Andreas Wagner for his contribution and all the pointer from de-RSE email list members.

Jupyter Notebooks are a way in which you can write and execute code in the browser. This is a small and simple step but most definitely not the end of the story. It is worth reflecting that another small step of the editable web ‘a wiki’ from Ward Cunningham in 1994 (Cunningham and Leuf 2001) wasn’t always around and the changes this brought about are plain to see.

First and foremost Jupyter Notebooks (Rule, Tabard, and Hollan 2018) has gained attention in research fields because it offers a route for reproducibility of research results. A Jupyter Notebook file can be downloaded and instantly the package can be run in the browser to generate results, say a chart, while simultaneously the data and code for generating results, such as a chart, can be examined.

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Top 10 FAIR Data & Software Things

Christopher Erdmann, Natasha Simons, Reid Otsuji, Stephanie Labou, Ryan Johnson, Guilherme Castelao, Bia Villas Boas, et al. “Top 10 FAIR Data & Software Things”. February 1, 2019. doi:10.5281/zenodo.2555498.

A two-day worldwide sprint held on 29-30 November 2018 to develop domain-relevant guides on FAIR.

By Chris Erdmann and Natasha Simons

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Imagine a Research Future Defined by Open Values: Introducing the Open Science MOOC

Image: UN Sustainable Development Goals https://www.un.org/sustainabledevelopment/sustainable-development-goals/

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DOI:

10.25815/6hyr-g583

Citation format: The Chicago Manual of Style, 17th Edition

Tennant, Jon. ‘Imagine a Research Future Defined by Open Values: Introducing the Open Science MOOC’, 2019. https://doi.org/10.25815/6hyr-g583.

The world of research is not working as well as it could be. On all sides we see issues with reproducibility, questionable research practices, barriers and walls, wasteful research, and flawed incentive and reward systems. If we want research to be more effective in helping to solve the problems our world currently faces, we have to be better.

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Redistributing the Future: An Interview with MOVING MOOC Makers Sabine Barthold and Franziska Günther

Cite as: DOI:10.25815/J661-FK24

Citation format: The Chicago Manual of Style, 17th Edition

Barthold, S., & Günther, F. Redistributing the Future: An Interview with MOVING MOOC Makers Sabine Barthold and Franziska Günther. Generation R. https://doi.org/10.25815/J661-FK24.

Sabine and Franziska explore how they see MOVING MOOC, alongside other open science initiatives, as contributing to closing the research skills gap between what open science has on offer for the future of research and what is being delivered for students and young researchers in universities now — with the aim to providing a ‘safe space’ to up their open collaborative science skills. To use William Gibson’s much used adage “The future is already here — it’s just not evenly distributed”.

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Making a ‘Pre-Publishing’ Research Workflow Open Source

Being open & transparent saves time & improves research

Image: Before – After. ‘Being open & transparent saves time & improves research: The Grackle Project’ and ‘Making a ‘Pre-Publishing’ Research Workflow Open Source’ modification of slide 25 from keynote presentation from the 13th Munin Conference (Tromsø, Norway) by Dr. Corina Logan, “We won’t be… ‘Bullied into Bad Science'”, 28.11.2018, https://osf.io/sy9f7/ | See section ‘Failing to make the complete workflow Open Source’ for annotations

At the Munin conference on scholarly publishing in Norway at the end of November (2018) Dr. Corina Logan presented a keynote “We won’t be… ‘Bullied into Bad Science'”. While following on the livestream GenR offered, as an experiment, to convert Dr. Logan’s ‘pre-publishing’ workflow to use only Open Source tools. As a collaborative open-work using Cryptpad we have been able to replace ‘most’ tools and for the exceptions chart a way to make a totally Free and Open Source Software workflow. In this short experiment, once again a
recurring issue has been encountered, that the basic provision of an infrastructural pillar of ‘modern research literacy’ has been overlooked—namely Open Source software—in this case the provision of ‘simple tools for authoring’. This is only the start of the work and your invited to chip in on the pad — EDITME!.

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