Open Participatory Research — Four Challenges for Opening Science Beyond Scientific Institutions

Image: Do-It-Together Science Bus, 2017, Waag (BY-NC-SA), https://waag.org/nl/project/do-it-together-science-bus

Cite as:

DOI

10.25815/qykn-de07

Citation format: The Chicago Manual of Style, 17th Edition

Göbel, Claudia. ‘Open Participatory Research — Four Challenges for Opening Science Beyond Scientific Institutions’, 2019. https://doi.org/10.25815/qykn-de07.

Claudia Göbel proposes a framework of examination for how Citizen Science and other types of participatory research should form a more prominent part of the much needed cultural change in knowledge institutions. This is to complement the many reforms already underway in other areas of Open Science & Scholarship.

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Loners, Pathfinders, or Explorers? How are the Humanities Progressing in Open Science?

Image: Barcamp Open Science, organized by the Leibniz Research Alliance Open Science and hosted by Wikimedia Deutschland, 18 March, 2019, Berlin. Ralf Rebmann, CC BY 4.0 license.

Cite as:

DOI

10.25815/x516-wf23

Citation format: The Chicago Manual of Style, 17th Edition

Tóth-Czifra, Erzsébet & Wuttke, Ulrike. ‘Loners, Pathfinders, or Explorers? How are the Humanities Progressing in Open Science?’, 2019. https://doi.org/10.25815/x516-wf23.

There is an ever-increasing number of people who are interested in — or practice — Open Science or Open Scholarship. Whatever it means to us individually, we all have a need from time to time to see the bigger picture and reflect on where are we in this space: what we hope to achieve through it, how others can help us, and reflect on what are the shared values in the open research culture for us and for the society at large.

The Open Science Barcamp, which was for the fifth year already a recurring pre-event for the more formal International Open Science Conference in Berlin, is all about this reflection. It brings together open-minded curious people from different countries, (disciplinary) background and level of involvement in Open Science for a full day of informal, but intensive and action-oriented exchange about how to take collaboration, transparency, reproducibility, and in general the development of an open culture to the next level.

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Open Science Top Ten Tools – All Open Source!

DOI:

10.25815/7hta-ve88

Citation format: The Chicago Manual of Style, 17th Edition

Generation R. ‘Open Science Top Ten Tools – All Open Source!’, 2019. https://doi.org/10.25815/7hta-ve88.

A list of general purpose tools for researchers compiled by Generation R which can be used with no additional learning other than standard user interface familiarity.

There will be an advanced ‘Data Scientists 4 All’ Top Ten coming soon 🙂

This top ten index is part of GenRs theme Integrating Open Science Learning into Higher Education (Jan/Mar 2019).

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Will Education Become More Open?

Fig 1. The interplay of open science and open education

D

OI:

10.25815/hh4f-zn73

Citation format: The Chicago Manual of Style, 17th Edition

Heck, Tamara. ‘Will Education Become More Open?’, 2019. https://doi.org/10.25815/hh4f-zn73.

Open science practitioners embrace the ideas of sharing and communicating their research and interests as well as collaborating with like-minded peers, i.e., practicing co-science (McKiernan et al. 2016) such as on the Open Science MOOC1 platform. If they admit to those goals regarding their research, it can be assumed that those researchers adapt their attitudes and practices towards learning and teaching, respectively. So, if researchers move towards open science practices, will they do so in their higher education teaching? Will education become more open? More generally, what would open science principles (Bezjak et al. 2018) in education look like, for educators and learners, respectively?

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Teaching Impact is Key to Make Science Socially Relevant

Image: CC0, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Knowledge_transfer#/media/File:Knowledge_transfer.svg

DOI:

10.25815/qx24-8m92

Citation format: The Chicago Manual of Style, 17th Edition

Benedikt Fecher, Nataliia Sokolovska & Marcel Hebing. ‘Teaching Impact is Key to Make Science Socially Relevant’, 2019. https://doi.org/10.25815/qx24-8m92.

By: Benedikt Fecher, Alexander von Humboldt Institute for Internet and Society;
Nataliia Sokolovska, Alexander von Humboldt Institute for Internet and Society;
Marcel Hebing, Impact Distillery & Alexander von Humboldt Institute for Internet and Society

Funders and policy makers increasingly demand that science has societal impact. This becomes apparent in national debates (e.g., the German Wissenschaftsrat position paper on Knowledge transfer) or supranational initiatives like the European Commission’s strategy “Open innovation, open science, open to the world“. The call for societal relevance of research is motivated by an increased need for scientific expertise in the light of global and multidisciplinary challenges such as climate change, migration, or digitisation, and partly of course as a return-of-investment expectation. Societal impact is en vogue.

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