An Open Energy System Modeling Community

Image: GPLv2+ license notice for the now‑defunct deeco energy system model added on 24 February 2003. Courtesy Robbie Morrison

Cite as:

DOI

10.25815/ff3b-d154

Citation format: The Chicago Manual of Style, 17th Edition

Morrison, Robbie . ‘An Open Energy System Modeling Community’, 2019. https://doi.org/10.25815/ff3b-d154.

The Open Energy Modelling Initiative (shortened to openmod) is an online and offline umbrella community devoted to promoting open energy system modeling and analysis. While there are no restrictions on application area, the bulk of funded research is directed toward questions involving public policy. As of late‑2019, the openmod has about 600 participants on its mailing list, with most of them being full‑time researchers or analysts. More information on Wikipedia. Key URLs are listed in the infobox below.

Read More

YouTube — Fix Your AI for Climate Change! An Invitation to an Open Dialogue

Image: Ganges River Delta. Image provided by the USGS EROS Data Center Satellite Systems Branch. Caption adapted from text provided by NASA’s Earth Observatory. Source: NASA/USGS Landsat 7; NASA Earth Observatory. From NASA Climate YouTube channel https://www.youtube.com/user/NASAClimate

An interview with Joachim Allgaier on his recently published study on how social media platforms such as YouTube have become hostile to climate science. When you search around climate change on YouTube the results are 50/50 climate science versus anti-science Chemtrails conspiracy theories. YouTube and Google Scholar have been strategically hijacked by groups posting anti-science content, while at the same time academia has neglected to use YouTube and recognise it as the vitally important channel for their scientific voices to be heard. The interview is a call for scientists to actively engage with the platform and for YouTube to reflect the values put forward by its CEO and Google co-founder Susan Wojcicki of an appreciation of the scholarly environment within Silicon Valley. These values could be actioned in YouTube’s AI to favor scientific factual content and by adopting Open Science practices of enhanced transparency across its platforms as anti-science Chemtrails content is also immediately found in search results on Google Scholar. Open has worked for Google’s support of its technology stack with open source, why not apply the same workings to its search indexing, dare it be said by applying a little open library science.

Open Call — Indexing FOSS Research Software Code for Climate Change: Specifically in Open Energy Modelling

Open Climate Knowledge #OCK https://github.com/petermr/climate

— Invitation to get involved! Questions or comments raise an issue on GitHub or via Twitter @Gen_R_

This call is for a first round of analysis to establish statistics on rates of FOSS licencing for code used in research software for climate change.


Open Climate Knowledge (OCK) is an open research project with the objective to urgently make research related to climate change 100% open. Research publishing related to climate change currently appear to only be at <30% open access. (Tai and Robinson 2018)

There are two steps to enable the transition of climate change research to being fully open.

  • Firstly, gathering statistics on the rates of openly licensed works and
  • secondly, to create a plan and recommendations to accelerate the push forward full open licensing of research.

The OCK project started in September 2019 at the #elifesprint 2019 as a cooperation between the chemist and open access advocate Peter Murray-Rust and Simon Worthington of Generation Research.

Open Climate Knowledge: 100% OA for Climate Change 📖 / 🌍

Peter Murray-Rust launched the openNotebook resource at last week’s #eLifeSprint2019*. openNotebook is a framework for data mining, searching, and reusing research publications. Below he walks through the steps of how to use the framework in the context of climate change and opening up research to the public. Peter Murray-Rust, GenR and the Open Science Lab at TIB have initiated an open research collaboration Open Climate Knowledge to address the question of how to improve on the low rates of open access publishing related to climate change. Together we want to change this. Firstly by establishing better stats on OA rates and secondly, by coming up with a plan and recommendations for an accelerated transition to 100% OA for climate change.

Read More