Redistributing the Future: An Interview with MOVING MOOC Makers Sabine Barthold and Franziska Günther

Cite as: DOI:10.25815/J661-FK24

Citation format: The Chicago Manual of Style, 17th Edition

Barthold, S., & Günther, F. Redistributing the Future: An Interview with MOVING MOOC Makers Sabine Barthold and Franziska Günther. Generation R. https://doi.org/10.25815/J661-FK24.

Sabine and Franziska explore how they see MOVING MOOC, alongside other open science initiatives, as contributing to closing the research skills gap between what open science has on offer for the future of research and what is being delivered for students and young researchers in universities now — with the aim to providing a ‘safe space’ to up their open collaborative science skills. To use William Gibson’s much used adage “The future is already here — it’s just not evenly distributed”.

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Integrating Open Science Learning into Higher Education: A GenR Theme – Jan/Feb ’19

The Open Science learning theme will take two approaches to the question of how to integrate Open Science practices into higher education. The first, will be to examine ways for students to get on board — using Open Science methods, using open source tools, or being made aware of how to get ‘more’ credit and attribution. The second approach, being about trends and innovations in ways of teaching, for example ‘The Carpentries’ an open peer-learning network for data, software, and library skills with the formula of being ‘welcoming’ and making good use of the wealth of teaching methods available.

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Making a ‘Pre-Publishing’ Research Workflow Open Source

Being open & transparent saves time & improves research

Image: Before – After. ‘Being open & transparent saves time & improves research: The Grackle Project’ and ‘Making a ‘Pre-Publishing’ Research Workflow Open Source’ modification of slide 25 from keynote presentation from the 13th Munin Conference (Tromsø, Norway) by Dr. Corina Logan, “We won’t be… ‘Bullied into Bad Science'”, 28.11.2018, https://osf.io/sy9f7/ | See section ‘Failing to make the complete workflow Open Source’ for annotations

At the Munin conference on scholarly publishing in Norway at the end of November (2018) Dr. Corina Logan presented a keynote “We won’t be… ‘Bullied into Bad Science'”. While following on the livestream GenR offered, as an experiment, to convert Dr. Logan’s ‘pre-publishing’ workflow to use only Open Source tools. As a collaborative open-work using Cryptpad we have been able to replace ‘most’ tools and for the exceptions chart a way to make a totally Free and Open Source Software workflow. In this short experiment, once again a
recurring issue has been encountered, that the basic provision of an infrastructural pillar of ‘modern research literacy’ has been overlooked—namely Open Source software—in this case the provision of ‘simple tools for authoring’. This is only the start of the work and your invited to chip in on the pad — EDITME!.

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Illuminating Dark Knowledge



How innovation in search engines needs renewing with
open working and open indexes

Image: LA at Night, Wikimedia, https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/7/75/LA_at_night.jpg 

Without being able to build on top of existing — search tools and indexes — innovation in search engines is being held back and letting down researchers and the public. The Open Access and Open Science movement that have worked hard to make free hundreds of thousands of publications, but at the last mile search engines are failing to effectively deliver on discovery. Public knowledge is hidden in plain sight — a phenomenon called “Dark Knowledge”. This article is a call for open infrastructural ‘ways of working’ to be adopted as ‘the new normal’ to turn this situation around in software and interface development for scholarly search.

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An Interview with de-RSE: Supporting Researchers Using Software

Image: de-RSE https://www.de-rse.org/de/index.html

de-RSE – Research Science Engineers: A New Association in Germany

An interview by GenR with members of the newly forming German association of Research Software Engineers – de-RSE. The association is being formally constituted in late November 2018 (next week 26th Nov., Berlin) and will provide a new support network for the wider software community. Highlights being a summer 2019 conference in Potsdam, and a fellowship programme. The interview is the first in a series of article in GenR’s theme ‘Socializing Infrastructures‘ and we take the opportunity to ask de-RSE for their comments on Open Science infrastructures and ‘software as infrastructure’.

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